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Long-Term Ecosystem Research in Europe

Rio+20: major IIED conference on environment and sustainable development

The International Institute for Environment and Development will hold a major conference on 16-17 June in Rio, just before the Rio+20 Earth Summit. The conference will cover energy, agriculture, forests, business models for sustainable development and more, and will feed into the Rio+20 itself.
When 16 Jun, 2012 10:00 AM to
17 Jun, 2012 10:00 AM
Where Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Contact Name
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The conference focuses on the four themes: 

  • Shaping Sustainable Development Goals
  • Urbanisation that improves lives
  • Business models for sustainability
  • Transforming economic systems for people and planet

 

Below you can find some information about the programme. For a more detailed look at the programme you can download it from this site – www.fairideas.org – which is also where you can register (no cost) to attend.

 

PLENARY: BETTER LIVES, SMALLER FOOTPRINTS

Achim Steiner, UNEP

Johan Rockstrom, Stockholm Resilience Centre

 

TRANSFORMING INNOVATION FOR SUSTAINABILITY

  • Glauco Arbix (Brazilian Ministry of Science and Technology)
  • Lidia Brito (UNESCO) 
  • Melissa Leach (STEPS Centre)
  • Johan Rockstrom (Stockholm Resilience Centre)
  • Kevin Urama (African Technology Policy Studies Network)

Informed by the STEPS Centre’s ‘3D agenda’ for innovation and the Stockholm Resilience Centre’s work on ‘planetary boundaries’, this session will focus on new approaches to governing innovation that give more power to the grassroots to address social and economic aspirations, whilst also keeping within the ‘safe operating space for humanity’.  An institutional framework that fosters innovation for local, national and global sustainable development objectives may be a key theme at Rio+20, but guiding principles for such a framework are proving elusive. The session will hear proposals from an international panel of leading researchers and practitioners who are closely engaged with these debates.

 

BUSINESS MODELS FOR SUSTAINABILITY

  • Steve Bass/ Camilla Toulmin, IIED
  • Pavan Sukhdev, Corporation 2020 (confirmed)
  • Ashok Khosla, Development Alternatives Group (confirmed)
  • Wilfred Kamami, Wilmar Flowers (invited)

Panel:  Rob Walton Walmart (invited), Gail Klintworth Unilever, S Africa(invited), Jochen Zeitz Puma (invited), Alessandro Carlucci NATURA, Brasil (invited)

Aim: To explore the diversity of approaches to ensuring that sustainable development becomes central to business models, and ways in which they might be mutually supportive. In just 90 minutes, we will not have time to cover the spread of business models from MNCs to state enterprise to SMEs to informal economic activity. Thus we will focus on the imperatives concerning big players, using this to put three sustainable development business models – that need to be better linked – on the same page: 1. Effective corporate business models – the Corporation 2020 thesis, which will be launched at Rio. 2. Linking corporations with small-scale producers – the IIED ‘linking worlds’ proposition, for which a major phase of evidence will be launched at Rio. 3. Major social enterprise for achieving joint economic, social and environmental goals – models that apply business principles for their sustainability and scale-up, rather than grant-funding.

 

LOCALLY CONTROLLED FARM-FORESTRY: A FIRM FOUNDATION FOR FAIR GREEN ECONOMIES?

  • Duncan Macqueen, IIED
  • The Three Rights Holders’ Group (G3): the International Family Forest Alliance, the Global Alliance for Community Forestry and the International Alliance for Indigenous and Tribal Peoples of the Tropical Forests

Sustainability is crucial to one planet existence. But growing populations with growing expectations are putting the squeeze on natural resources and threatening local livelihoods. How can we ensure a sustainable approach to farm-forestry that promotes equity and respects ecological limits? This session will debate the merits of stronger local control over farm-forestry as a viable way forward. Might a firmer grip for local people shift wealth and power to those with less, while creating strong incentives to manage and restore natural resources for the global good? Or will the explicit trade-offs in wealth and power make it unworkable irrespective of local and global outcomes? Join family, community and indigenous forest right-holders as we debate this issue and explore how to invest in locally controlled farm-forestry.

  

AID FINANCE FOR THE 21ST CENTURY: CATALYSING CHANGE WITH LOCALLY-CONTROLLED FUNDS

  • Diana Mitlin, IIED
  • Somsook Boonyabancha, Asian Coalition for Housing Rights
  • Members of the Zimbabwe Homeless People’s Federation
  • Forest Partnerships and Duncan Macqueen, IIED

In the face of widespread criticism about ways of delivering aid, some donors are committed

to finding new ways to deliver aid to grassroots organisations.  The challenge for forward-thinking development agencies is to catalyse a more effective state process that addresses the needs of local residents.  Long experience suggests that this can only happen if changes are driven by local political realities.  IIED manages a number of donor-financed initiatives to support the work of local agencies working for pro-poor social change.  These initiatives have supported activities in urban development, rural water and sanitation and forestry.  In this session, IIED will consider how these initiatives, which use decentralised financing mechanisms, are catalysing pro-poor social change; and how the funds are being used by low-income groups to demonstrate new and more effective ways of advancing their needs and interests

 

ACCESS TO ENERGY: BEYOND 2012

  • IIED and partners

Access to energy is set to be a hot topic on Day 1 of Fair ideas. It will provide a key focus for the morning plenary ‘Better lives, smaller footprints’. And it will fuel several subsequent discussions throughout the venue, on issues such as feed-in tariffs, metrics and indicators of success, ‘energy pathways’ and the role of the private sector. Other discussions will focus on lessons learnt from experience — asking what works and what needs improving, and how can success stories such as Brazil’s Luz Para Todos programme be replicated elsewhere. The afternoon session in Lecture Theatre 2 will build on the outcomes of these discussions to foster a debate around one or two key issues relating to the Sustainable Energy for All initiative, the aims of UN International Year of Sustainable Energy for All, and what will happen post 2012.

 

URBANISATION AND THE GREEN ECONOMY

  • IIED
  • Sergio Besserman

Over the coming decades almost all population growth and most economic development will be urban. This should be a good thing — urbanisation offers both economic advantages and opportunities to reduce environmental burdens and share the benefits of economic growth. But overstretched urban authorities often fail to respond appropriately to rapid urban population growth, and fail to manage the potential environmental transition. The resulting dominance of exclusionary and environmentally heedless policies has tended to create a legacy of urban social inequality and environmental distress.This session will examine Brazil’s precocious urban transition, its legacy, and the lessons for other urbanizing countries. It will also explore how cities around the world can respond to the sustainability challenge, become more inclusive, and network effectively to ensure that urbanisation does contribute to green and equitable urban development. Keynote speakers will consider:

  • How urbanisation can help to reconcile economic, environmental and social goals (IIED)
  • How Brazil has managed its urbanisation and lessons that can be shared with other urbanising countries (UNFPA / -IIED)
  • The challenges of greening cities (City Mayor)
  • The challenges of creating equitable cities (ACCA TBC)
  • Synergies within the urban informal sector: Employment and waste recycling (TBC)
  • The role of city networks (TBC)"

 

SHAPING A NEW ECONOMY: HOW CAN INNOVATIVE GOVERNANCE WORK FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

  • Vitae Civilis
  • Ethos Institute
  • FBOMS
  • IDS

How can economic tools be used to promote fair and sustainable development? In the run-up to Rio+20, a range of lively discussions have sprung up to try and answer this question. Brazilian NGO Vitae Civilis, and partners from civil society, government, labour and business sectors, have contributed to the conversation by hosting a wide range of debates within Brazil focusing on topics such as governance systems, social participation and control, job creation, economic and market instruments and the coexistence of fair human prosperity and nature. This session will present and discuss the main conclusions from these dialogues, examining what it takes to shape a new economy.

 

DEFENDING THE PUBLIC: PARTICIPATION, FUTURE GENERATIONS, AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

  • FDSD, WRI, All China Environment Foundation, Public Trust Doctrine alliance

Whatever a nation’s political system, public participation is an integral principle of sustainable development. But making engagement meaningful and ensuring that it helps to deliver sustainable development continue to pose major challenges. This workshop will highlight practical approaches to public participation and defending the public interest from a range of settings; provide an opportunity to debate principles for equipping one political system; democracy; to deliver sustainable development; and consider options for bringing  future generations who have yet to be born  and are so often left out of decision-making into public governance.

 

REDD+ IN THE BRAZILIAN AMAZON: ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND NEXT STEPS TO CONSERVATION AND POVERTY ALLEVIATION

  • Virgilio Viana FAS (Amazonas Sustainable Foundation);
  • Paulo Mountinho IPAM (Amazon Environmental Research Institute);
  • Almir Suruí, Paiter Suruí Indigenous Group;
  • Mariano Cenamo, Idesam (Institute for the Conservation and Sustainable Development of Amazonas);
  • Fernanda Carvalho TNC (The Nature Conservancy)

 

AGRICULTURAL BIODIVERSITY ACKNOWLEDGED

  • Hivos plus Oxfam Novib - the Netherlands
  • Andrew Mushita, Community Technology Development Trust ( Zimbabwe)
  • Paulo Petersen ASPTA, (Brazil) TBC
  • Sue Edwards, Institute for Sustainable Development (Ethiopia)
  • Business and Biodiversity TBC

From the genes of plants and animals to the biosphere; all is biodiversity. We know biodiversity is important for the resilience of our planet and for the survival of us as human beings. Yet, transforming sectors to take biodiversity serious is slow -- too slow. Take the agricultural sector.  There are many internal contradictions. Agriculture is one of the greatest destroyers of biodiversity and at the same time farmers are seen as the guardians of agricultural biodiversity whose livelihood directly depends on biodiversity. Currently the sector is under serious pressure to deliver more food, more feed and more fuels.  How to move away from single productivity discussions to developing more resilient farming system?  This session brings together different stakeholders. It focuses on the importance of agricultural biodiversity in addressing the current economic, social and environmental challenges in the agricultural sector. Speakers from around the world will reveal the key factors in accelerating transformations to resilience.

  

REFLECTING ON A DECADE OF MINING, MINERALS AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

  • IIED and International Council on Mining and Minerals

Ten years ago, the Mining, Minerals and Sustainable Development (MMSD) programme published a landmark report, Breaking New Ground, laying out an agenda for the mining and minerals sector to improve its social, developmental, and environmental performance. How has the industry fared? IIED, which housed the MMSD research programme, has been reviewing progress — examining key achievements, stumbling blocks and future challenges. This session will share the findings of that review and subsequent discussions. What does sustainable development mean for mining today? What does mining in the green economy look like? What links minerals and metals consumption and production? And what can other sectors learn from MMSD? These are some of the questions that will be on the table.

  

ENVIRONMENT AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES: IMPROVING LIVES

  • ESPA, WAVES, PEI (convened by IIED)

ESPA, WAVES and PEI are global programmes that are working to ensure that the contribution that the environment and ecosystem services makes to improving lives is recognised and features in policy and practice.  The programmes and their international partnerships are generating evidence that demonstrates how the environment improves lives, especially for poor people in developing countries.  Practical examples will be provided by researchers and team members from projects including participants joining from around the world by live video connections demonstrating that it need not cost the earth to save the world.

 

CHANGING MINDSETS: SMALL-SCALE FARMERS IN THE GLOBALISED MARKET

  • Hivos, the Netherlands
  • IIED and partners

In a modern and globalised world, we increasingly look to the world’s half billion small-scale farms to ensure food security and sustainable economic growth. But small-scale farmers are not scaled-down versions of large farms, especially when it comes to engaging with state policies, formal producer organisations and formal markets. A three-year knowledge programme coordinated by IIED, Hivos and a global learning network of people from business, farming, civil society and academia has compelling evidence on how the debate on small-scale production needs to change. In this session we will present key insights from the programme, and invite you to debate with us why a change in mindsets in needed.

More information about this event…